Researching Development

Opinion

A Gaming Revolution for International Development

Mariam Adil World Bank Group
There are more than one billion people living under $1.25 a day and almost the same number playing at least one hour of video games worldwide. So, how can the popularity of games be harnessed for positive social change?
21 March 2017

Fish-like flow sensing on underwater vehicles

Ajay Giri Prakash Kottapalli, Meghali Bora Singapore-MIT Alliance for Research and Technology (SMART), Jianmin Miao Nanyang Technological University, Singapore & Michael Triantafyllou Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Natural biological sensors, designed, tested, and adapted via evolutionary processes, typically exhibit sensing performances that far exceed those currently achieved by human-engineered sensors. Bioinspired and biomimetic flow velocity sensors, inspired by the mechanosensory lateral-line system found in blind cavefish, can be used for a wide range of applications including underwater robots.
5 February 2017

Are Pro-Government Political Militias Evidence of a Strong State?

Roudabeh Kishi University of Sussex, Ciara Aucoin ACLED & Clionadh Raleigh University of Sussex
The growth of pro-government political militias and unidentified armed groups has traditionally been associated with weak state capacity however, new research suggests this may be a method of institutional management and can be seen as evidence of a strong state rather than a fragile one.
13 March 2016

Measuring Global Success

Michael Weatherburn Imperial College London
Much debate surrounds the choice of indicator used to determine economic performance and stage of development for governments, businesses and citizens.
24 January 2016

Behavioural insights in the age of austerity

Jennifer Sheehy-Skeffington Brunel University London
The science of behavioural insights is increasingly seen as an essential component of the toolkit of the savvy policy-maker. However, advances in economic, social, cultural, and evolutionary psychology remind us to keep society, as well as the individual, in focus when looking for the root causes of social problems
17 December 2015

Climate Change, Health, and Migration

Anna Brach & Khalid Koser Geneva Centre for Security Policy
In 2003, one million people fled Beijing during a SARS outbreak. In 2009, tens of thousands fled Zimbabwe during an outbreak of cholera. Anna Brach and Khalid Koser discuss how health crises arising from climate change are a significant driver of mass migration.
20 October 2015

Is Guilt a Good Motivator for Pro-social Behaviour?

Simon Hedlin Harvard Kennedy School of Government
Automatic enrolment to pro-social programmes is popular but unlikely to always be the optimal policy. New behavioural economics research suggests that whether a policy breeds guilt or resentment helps determine if it will be effective or not.
9 October 2015

Living above the Arctic Circle

Ilan Kelman University College London
Climate change affects everyone. For Arctic communities, the unpredictable nature of the changes is having a profound impact on health and entire livelihoods. The Arctic people know they’ll need to adapt to a rapidly changing landscape, one in which dependency on the seasons can no longer be relied upon.
30 September 2015

The Trans Pacific Partnership: Trade and Globalisation

Eoin Gahan
Shrouded in secrecy, and acting outside established international channels for trade negotiation, will the Trans Pacific Partnership further marginalise smaller and less developed nations in their quest to secure a place in the global marketplace?
22 June 2015

Investing in institutional ‘software’

Camilla Toulmin, Ced Hesse, Daoud Tari & Caroline King-Okumu International Institute for Environment and Development
Building resilience to extreme weather needs a systems approach, including institutional ‘software’ as well as technical, financial, and physical infrastructure – or ‘hardware’.
12 May 2015

Ebola: 38 years, 25 outbreaks

Michael Edelstein & David Heymann Chatham House
While forming a key component of the recent Ebola response, much debate surrounds how clinical trials testing new experimental treatments for the disease should be designed.
26 March 2015

Engaging Digital Citizens for Children’s Rights

Gerrit Beger UNICEF
Never before has there been such a rich opportunity to engage the world’s digital citizens, including a newly empowered youth, in issues surrounding children’s rights and well-being.
1 June 2014

Donated Drugs Against Neglected Tropical Diseases

Alan Fenwick Imperial College London
One in six of the world’s population live in rural areas, and suffer from poor health - especially chronic diseases caused by infection with parasitic diseases now known as ‘Neglected Tropical Diseases’ or NTDs.
1 June 2014

Hope for Humanitarianism

Lydia Tanner & Jennie Thomas Humanitarian Aid Relief Trust
Can humanitarian aid ever really be non-political? How far should NGOs go to avoid being drawn into the power-struggles inherent to warfare? And what happens when international organisations are denied access, and local communities become the only humanitarian actors?
1 October 2013
Opinion

The World Needs Science and Science Needs Women

Pratibha Gai The Univeristy of York & Katy Gandon L’Oréal UK & Ireland
With research showing that a mere 32 per cent of employed scientists and engineers are women, the challenge lies in being able to retain female scientific talent and encouraging a higher level of participation beyond school and into the workplace.
1 May 2013

Can We Make Our Demand for Food Sustainable and Secure?

Tim Benton University of Leeds
Addressing over-consumption and waste are routes to reducing demand, but these probably won’t balance the need to produce more food. To what extent can we increase food production in a way that is both sustainable and secure?
1 January 2013

What Do Menstruating Girls Need in Schools?

Seung Lee & Brad Kerner Save the Children
Imagine trying to attend classes in these schools while you have your menstrual period. Imagine your menstrual period is extremely painful. Imagine your reuse-able pad is soaked through but there is no running water to clean it, or that there is no trash bin to get rid of it. And don’t forget this happens every month.
1 January 2013

Investing in Africa

Franca Hoffmann University of Cambridge
According to the International Monetary Fund, seven of the ten fastest growing economies over the next five years will be in Africa, a figure which is starting to capture the attention of both private and institutional investors.
1 January 2013

The BRICS

Andrew Harmer University of Edinburgh, Folayinka Dania & Lesong Conteh Imperial College London
Since their emergence as a group, many commentators have championed the BRICS as good news for global health. However, this article seeks to explore whether it is right to assume that their economic accolades readily extend to the sphere of Global Health.
1 January 2013

Nanotechnology for Sustainable Development

Antonio Torrisi Imperial College London
The science of the very small, nanotechnology could play a key role in tackling many sustainable development issues ranging from fresh water supply and food decontamination to green technology.
1 October 2012

Re-Thinking Rural Architecture in Syria

M. Hosam Jiroudy The Prince’s School of Traditional Arts
This article outlines a model for developing rural housing in Syria by means of relying on local resources including labour, materials and techniques.
1 October 2012

Lighting up Lives with Energy Efficient Lighting

Michelle Moram Imperial College London
New Light Emitting Diode (LED) technology could potentially achieve a reduction of 15% in total electricity consumption in developed countries
1 May 2012
Copyright 2015 ANGLE Journal