Latest Articles

An Evolutionary Arms Race

Charlotte Kerr, Laura Higham FAI Farms, Oxford & Øistein Thorsen FAI Farms
Around 700,000 lives are lost worldwide due to antimicrobial-resistant infections every year. Without viable antibiotic treatment options we are likely to return to a relative dark age of medicine – a time when common infections or injuries could kill, and common surgeries and immunosuppressive therapies may become unfeasible.
10 June 2017

Fish Food

Maria Hayes Teagasc Food Research Centre
Seaweeds and microalgae, containing up to 47% dry weight protein, provide a viable protein source. Could seaweed-based foods feed future generations?
15 May 2017

The Role of Interdisciplinary Institutes in Knowledge Diffusion

Alyssa Gilbert Imperial College London
Universities are sitting on a vast swathe of untapped knowledge and by presenting this information in different formats to new audiences it is possible to forge more and various effective conduits to the non-academic world.
8 May 2017

The logic of synthetic biology: turning cells into computers

Matthew R. Bennett Rice University
For years scientists have been studying E. coli as historians would an ancient tome. Biologists, biochemists, and geneticists have dissected, poked, and prodded E. coli until it gave up its secrets: the basic principles of cellular life. Synthetic biologists, on the other hand, look at E. coli and think to themselves: “let’s make a computer”.
9 April 2017

Bridging science and government

Tateo Arimoto National Graduate Institute for Policy Studies, Yasushi Sato & Keiko Matsuo Japan Science and Technology Agency, Center for Research and Development Strategy
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27 March 2017

A Gaming Revolution for International Development

Mariam Adil World Bank Group
There are more than one billion people living under $1.25 a day and almost the same number playing at least one hour of video games worldwide. So, how can the popularity of games be harnessed for positive social change?
21 March 2017

Fish-like flow sensing on underwater vehicles

Ajay Giri Prakash Kottapalli, Meghali Bora Singapore-MIT Alliance for Research and Technology (SMART), Jianmin Miao Nanyang Technological University, Singapore & Michael Triantafyllou Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Natural biological sensors, designed, tested, and adapted via evolutionary processes, typically exhibit sensing performances that far exceed those currently achieved by human-engineered sensors. Bioinspired and biomimetic flow velocity sensors, inspired by the mechanosensory lateral-line system found in blind cavefish, can be used for a wide range of applications including underwater robots.
5 February 2017

Latino Kids and Autism. Why Are They Diagnosed So Late?

Ranit Mishori Georgetown University School of Medicine, Jeanine Warisse Turner Georgetown University's Center for Communication, Culture, and Technology (CCT), Alisse Hannaford Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai & Matthew Biel MedStar Georgetown University Medical Center/Georgetown University School of Medicine
15 January 2017

Moving the borders into healthcare

Fozia Hamid & Lucy Jones Doctors of the World UK
A political drive in the UK is leading to undermining of access to primary and emergency care for many vulnerable groups despite evidence of potential harm to individual and public health. Bringing little if any economic benefit, the policy to introduce charges for primary care and A&E for visitors and migrants is progressing at pace while critics of the policy are side-lined.
11 October 2016

Does research guide tobacco control policy in Europe?

Filippos Filippidis Imperial College London
Despite the enforcement of the revised Tobacco Products Directive, aimed at tightening tobacco control policies throughout the EU, the orchestrated attempts of the tobacco industry to influence the outcome of the vote has raised concerns that research may have less importance in the shaping of public health policies.
3 October 2016

From research leader to technology customer

Adrian Bull & Jon Hyde National Nuclear Laboratory
In the face of climate change, and dwindling, insecure access to fossil fuels, nuclear power is expected to play a key role in the UK's energy strategy over the coming decades. But does it have the skills and capabilities to sustain the development of the nuclear sector after decades of neglect from government and industry?
24 June 2016

Brexit: the UK in the departure lounge

Eoin Gahan
If Brexit happens, the UK will not be in a strong position to face global challenges. Lagging in trade openness and innovation, and facing a divergent regulatory environment and declining foreign investment, the UK will struggle to re-negotiate trade deals with global partners. Conversely, as the influence of the EU moves east, increased political coherence could benefit the Euro and EU financial sector.
10 June 2016

Solving an age-old riddle: Can inertial confinement finally deliver fusion?

Edward Hill Imperial College London
With an ever-increasing energy demand, the world is in need of a powerful and inexhaustible energy source. Nuclear fusion, presenting the additional advantage of being a clean source of energy, is the ideal candidate. Inertial confinement could solve the remaining challenge of producing high enough temperatures and pressures to hold the fusion material together.
1 June 2016

The Digital Revolution: Why do you Google?

Andreas Ekström Sydsvenskan
While we seem to be enchanted by the idea, there really is no such thing as an unbiased search result.
14 May 2016

Why Should We Go Nuclear?

Laurence Williams Imperial College London
Nuclear energy is considered controversial due to threats from large accidents, terrorist activity and nuclear waste storage. But nuclear power is important role to combat climate change and move society away from fossil fuels.
11 May 2016

Keeping the Lights On

Raphael Heffron Queen Mary University of London
The possibility of the UK exiting the European Union, or Brexit, could have a significant impact on national energy policy and infrastructure. The EU referendum could define whether the UK will meet its Paris COP21 targets, and what energy resources are utilised.
22 April 2016

Reading the Path of Antibiotic Decline in Bacterial DNA

Nicola J Fawcett & Louise J Pankhurst University of Oxford
DNA sequencing is an exciting modern technology, that has vastly improved our ability to treat infections. However antibiotic resistance is a growing problem and DNA sequencing is revealing the challenge we face as bacteria are rapidly evolving resistance to antibiotics.
18 April 2016

In the age of terror, are medical ethics a casualty of war?

Scott A. Allen University of California at Riverside School of Medicine, Leonard S. Rubenstein Johns Hopkins Center for Public Health and Human Rights & Phyllis A. Guze University of California at Riverside School of Medicine
Since the attacks of September 11, 2001, physicians serving under the direction of United States defense and intelligence agencies have at times been directed to act in ways that explicitly violate established medical ethics. The question is, is it ever acceptable for national security interests to trump ethical obligations?
6 April 2016

Are Pro-Government Political Militias Evidence of a Strong State?

Roudabeh Kishi University of Sussex, Ciara Aucoin ACLED & Clionadh Raleigh University of Sussex
The growth of pro-government political militias and unidentified armed groups has traditionally been associated with weak state capacity however, new research suggests this may be a method of institutional management and can be seen as evidence of a strong state rather than a fragile one.
13 March 2016
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