NEW RELEASE

The logic of synthetic biology: turning cells into computers

Matthew R. Bennett Rice University
9 April 2017

For years scientists have been studying E. coli as historians would an ancient tome. Biologists, biochemists, and geneticists have dissected, poked, and prodded E. coli until it gave up its secrets: the basic principles of cellular life. Synthetic biologists, on the other hand, look at E. coli and think to themselves: “let’s make a computer”.

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Tackling global challenges, one issue at a time. From energy and the environment to economics, development and global health, our expert contributors look at all angles. ANGLE focuses on the intersection of science, policy and politics in an evolving and complex world.

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VIRTUAL CITIZEN

How Much Surveillance Can Democracy Withstand?

Richard Stallman Free Software Foundation
We need to reduce the level of general surveillance, but how far? Where exactly is the maximum tolerable level of surveillance, which we must ensure is not exceeded?

The Digital Revolution: Why do you Google?

Andreas Ekström Sydsvenskan
While we seem to be enchanted by the idea, there really is no such thing as an unbiased search result.

Identity: Who Do You Think You Are?

Chris Hankin & Andrew Burton Imperial College London
By 2020, it is predicted that networked devices, streaming information and connecting us globally, will exceed 50 billion. But will we be able to switch off, or maintain distinct identities in online and offline worlds?

Imagine a future dominated by brain emulation robots

Robin Hanson George Mason University
History took us from the age of foraging to the age of farming, will brain emulation technology now take us from the industrial era to the age of the "em" economy?

NEW RELEASE

Bridging science and government

Tateo Arimoto National Graduate Institute for Policy Studies, Yasushi Sato & Keiko Matsuo Japan Science and Technology Agency, Center for Research and Development Strategy
27 March 2017

As science and technology have come to play critical roles in addressing (and in some cases precipitating) diverse issues in contemporary society, demand for scientific advice has soared. Yet, there lack norms and cross-disciplinary codes of conduct within this nascent field.

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Fish-like flow sensing on underwater vehicles

Ajay Giri Prakash Kottapalli, Meghali Bora Singapore-MIT Alliance for Research and Technology (SMART), Jianmin Miao Nanyang Technological University, Singapore & Michael Triantafyllou Massachusetts Institute of Technology
5 February 2017

Advanced flow sensing abilities enable fish to perform complex hydrodynamic manoeuvres. Understanding these is key to constructing viable artificial sensors.

Copyright 2015 ANGLE Journal