People

Opinion

A Gaming Revolution for International Development

Mariam Adil World Bank Group
There are more than one billion people living under $1.25 a day and almost the same number playing at least one hour of video games worldwide. So, how can the popularity of games be harnessed for positive social change?
21 March 2017

Latino Kids and Autism. Why Are They Diagnosed So Late?

Ranit Mishori Georgetown University School of Medicine, Jeanine Warisse Turner Georgetown University's Center for Communication, Culture, and Technology (CCT), Alisse Hannaford Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai & Matthew Biel MedStar Georgetown University Medical Center/Georgetown University School of Medicine
15 January 2017

Moving the borders into healthcare

Fozia Hamid & Lucy Jones Doctors of the World UK
A political drive in the UK is leading to undermining of access to primary and emergency care for many vulnerable groups despite evidence of potential harm to individual and public health. Bringing little if any economic benefit, the policy to introduce charges for primary care and A&E for visitors and migrants is progressing at pace while critics of the policy are side-lined.
11 October 2016

Does research guide tobacco control policy in Europe?

Filippos Filippidis Imperial College London
Despite the enforcement of the revised Tobacco Products Directive, aimed at tightening tobacco control policies throughout the EU, the orchestrated attempts of the tobacco industry to influence the outcome of the vote has raised concerns that research may have less importance in the shaping of public health policies.
3 October 2016
Opinion

The Digital Revolution: Why do you Google?

Andreas Ekström Sydsvenskan
While we seem to be enchanted by the idea, there really is no such thing as an unbiased search result.
14 May 2016

Are Pro-Government Political Militias Evidence of a Strong State?

Roudabeh Kishi University of Sussex, Ciara Aucoin ACLED & Clionadh Raleigh University of Sussex
The growth of pro-government political militias and unidentified armed groups has traditionally been associated with weak state capacity however, new research suggests this may be a method of institutional management and can be seen as evidence of a strong state rather than a fragile one.
13 March 2016
Opinion

Providing Safe Havens for Academics at Risk

Stephen Wordsworth Council for At-Risk Academics
"Where higher education is destroyed and a country’s academics and scientists are killed or scattered, its intellectual capital will be lost and its devastated society will be much harder to re-build".
17 February 2016

Measuring Global Success

Michael Weatherburn Imperial College London
Much debate surrounds the choice of indicator used to determine economic performance and stage of development for governments, businesses and citizens.
24 January 2016

Behavioural insights in the age of austerity

Jennifer Sheehy-Skeffington Brunel University London
The science of behavioural insights is increasingly seen as an essential component of the toolkit of the savvy policy-maker. However, advances in economic, social, cultural, and evolutionary psychology remind us to keep society, as well as the individual, in focus when looking for the root causes of social problems
17 December 2015

Fragile States

Caitlin E. Werrell & Francesco Femia Center for Climate and Security
The greatest migration since World War II is under way as refugees flow from Syria to both surrounding countries and Europe. Here we examine the role of climate change with regard to state fragility and migration, and propose three guiding principals for governments to follow when faced with complex and uncertain climate-related threats.
24 November 2015

Climate Change, Health, and Migration

Anna Brach & Khalid Koser Geneva Centre for Security Policy
In 2003, one million people fled Beijing during a SARS outbreak. In 2009, tens of thousands fled Zimbabwe during an outbreak of cholera. Anna Brach and Khalid Koser discuss how health crises arising from climate change are a significant driver of mass migration.
20 October 2015

Is Guilt a Good Motivator for Pro-social Behaviour?

Simon Hedlin Harvard Kennedy School of Government
Automatic enrolment to pro-social programmes is popular but unlikely to always be the optimal policy. New behavioural economics research suggests that whether a policy breeds guilt or resentment helps determine if it will be effective or not.
9 October 2015

Living above the Arctic Circle

Ilan Kelman University College London
Climate change affects everyone. For Arctic communities, the unpredictable nature of the changes is having a profound impact on health and entire livelihoods. The Arctic people know they’ll need to adapt to a rapidly changing landscape, one in which dependency on the seasons can no longer be relied upon.
30 September 2015

The debt humanity owes the environment

Paolo Vineis Imperial College London
The large extent of our debt with Nature is likely to have important repercussions on our health, including unforeseen impacts such as a rise in hypertension due to increased salinity of rivers and seas. Can synergies or 'co-benefits' arising from efforts to tackle climate change issues such as energy use and transportation also mitigate some of it's health effects?
22 September 2015

Global Risk: the Wildfire in the Commons

Sebastian Farquhar Global Priorities Project
What distinguishes many of today's problems from those faced by former generations? The interconnected nature of global issues like emerging bio-technologies and climate change raises the possibility of 'wildfire risks', where the actions of one can have a great impact on many.
24 June 2015

Bigger, Denser, Faster

Luis M. A. Bettencourt Santa Fe Institute
While cities exist in a mesmerizing diversity of size and form, it is possible to detect subtle patterns that are common to all cities in the form of both increasing returns to scale and economies of scale. Driving these dynamics, what matters for a city is a high density of social connections over time and space, facilitated by built-up space and everyday mobility patterns.
23 June 2015

Imagine a future dominated by brain emulation robots

Robin Hanson George Mason University
History took us from the age of foraging to the age of farming, will brain emulation technology now take us from the industrial era to the age of the "em" economy?
22 June 2015

The City and the Triumph of Diversity

Eduardo Lora Harvard University
Why do urban centres thrive despite serious social problems such as crime and pollution? Cities represent the triumph of diversity over uniformity, bringing together many complementary skills and inputs to foster complex economic activities.
22 June 2015

The Statistical Laws behind Cities

Andrés Gómez-Liévano Harvard University
The intersection of two unexpected fields, physics and urban studies, suggests that what defines humanity is hidden in abstract mathematical probability distributions that we use to describe cities.
22 June 2015

Lighting up Lives with Energy Efficient Lighting

Michelle Moram Imperial College London
New Light Emitting Diode (LED) technology could potentially achieve a reduction of 15% in total electricity consumption in developed countries
1 May 2012

Global Mental Health

Roxanne Keynejad General Adult Psychiatry at South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust
For global health to truly deliver the overarching aim of health equality for all, it must overcome the artificial dualism separating mental from physical illness
1 May 2012
Opinion

Accra Invaded

Franca Hoffmann University of Cambridge
High rates of urbanisation and population growth has led to housing and infrastructural incapacity in Ghana, threatening the country's economic success story.
1 January 2012
Copyright 2015 ANGLE Journal