Resources

Fish-like flow sensing on underwater vehicles

Ajay Giri Prakash Kottapalli, Meghali Bora Singapore-MIT Alliance for Research and Technology (SMART), Jianmin Miao Nanyang Technological University, Singapore & Michael Triantafyllou Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Natural biological sensors, designed, tested, and adapted via evolutionary processes, typically exhibit sensing performances that far exceed those currently achieved by human-engineered sensors. Bioinspired and biomimetic flow velocity sensors, inspired by the mechanosensory lateral-line system found in blind cavefish, can be used for a wide range of applications including underwater robots.
5 February 2017

Are Pro-Government Political Militias Evidence of a Strong State?

Roudabeh Kishi University of Sussex, Ciara Aucoin ACLED & Clionadh Raleigh University of Sussex
The growth of pro-government political militias and unidentified armed groups has traditionally been associated with weak state capacity however, new research suggests this may be a method of institutional management and can be seen as evidence of a strong state rather than a fragile one.
13 March 2016

Measuring Global Success

Michael Weatherburn Imperial College London
Much debate surrounds the choice of indicator used to determine economic performance and stage of development for governments, businesses and citizens.
24 January 2016

Solar Radiation Management Can Only Work if it Works for the Poor

Tim O'Brien Harvard University
A promising technology that aims to reflect a small percentage of sunlight back into space called Solar Radiation Management (SRM) could complement mitigation and adaptation in the fight against climate change.
1 December 2015

Why carbon pricing will not succeed

Peter Lang Member of Institution of Engineers Australia
Is ‪climate‬ modelling for carbon pricing based on theoretical assumptions that are unlikely to hold in the real world? The benefits of carbon pricing are highly uncertain, and hence it is likely not the most effective way to tackle greenhouse gas emissions.
26 November 2015

Living above the Arctic Circle

Ilan Kelman University College London
Climate change affects everyone. For Arctic communities, the unpredictable nature of the changes is having a profound impact on health and entire livelihoods. The Arctic people know they’ll need to adapt to a rapidly changing landscape, one in which dependency on the seasons can no longer be relied upon.
30 September 2015

Marine Energy: Somewhere Beyond The Sea?

Arjav Trivedi Imperial College London
Marine energy has the potential to play a key role in the UK's energy mix in the coming decades, benefited by both its geography and its historical expertise. It is now critical that the necessary steps are taken to enable the technology to progress to the commercially viable stage, and realise its full potential.
22 June 2015
Opinion

Power to the People: Building local energy capacity

Carl Lee University of Sheffield
The challenge of moving towards a low carbon future is one now embraced by the political leaders of the G7, but how that path will unfold is still a live political debate. Local energy co-operatives offer a viable and progressive path to sustainability.
22 June 2015

The Gathering Storm

Steve Trent Environmental Justice Foundation
A rights-based approach to protecting victims of climate-induced displacement is needed; one which recognises entitlement to assistance and protection, and leverages opportunities for safe and dignified migration.
15 May 2015

Geo-Science Versus the Nuclear Industry

Shigeyuki Koide
The Japanese government and their domestic nuclear industry are facing a serious dilemma. While geologists caution about the risk of active seismic faults the electric power industry is pressing the need to restart nuclear power plants.
1 January 2013

China’s Pro-Renewable Energy Approach

Judith Alazraque-Cherni Imperial College London
This article identifies the broad spectrum of challenges facing China’s energy sector and looks at the impact of this policy intervention on its development.
1 January 2013

Sunny Side Up: Photovoltaics of the Future

Jenny Nelson & Christopher Emmott Imperial College London
Until now only a fraction of 1% of energy has been provided by direct conversion of solar energy, but that is set to change: International Energy Agency projections anticipate that some 11% of electric power will be provided by solar technologies by 2050.
1 October 2012

The Age of Minor Metals

Kartik Rao Metalysis Ltd.
Recent friction in the field of rare earths and platinum group metals demonstrate that it will be essential to find a mutually beneficial outcome for the mineral wealthy and the technology rich.
1 October 2012

Why Our Nuclear Waste Isn't Going Anywhere

Philip de Grouchy Cornell & John O'Neill
The answer to nuclear waste disposal may lie in deep underground geological storage, yet this strategy faces strong ‘Not In My Back Yard’ opposition.
1 May 2012

Lighting up Lives with Energy Efficient Lighting

Michelle Moram Imperial College London
New Light Emitting Diode (LED) technology could potentially achieve a reduction of 15% in total electricity consumption in developed countries
1 May 2012

Arsenic: Mass Poisoning in the 21st Century

Flo Bullough Geological Society & Chris Moffatt
Access to clean water is a fundamental human need. We must find low-cost ways of analysing toxic contaminants in the field, and develop cheap and effective remediation methods.
1 May 2012
Opinion

Accra Invaded

Franca Hoffmann University of Cambridge
High rates of urbanisation and population growth has led to housing and infrastructural incapacity in Ghana, threatening the country's economic success story.
1 January 2012
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